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The Cumberland River, at left, is shown before construction of Wolf Creek Dam, which backed  up the river more than 100 miles to form what became known as Lake Cumberland.
 
   

Lake Cumberland attracts millions of visitors every year and is a popular destination for boating, fishing, and all types of water sports. Many people consider the lake the houseboat capital of the world.
            


  The Story of Lake Cumberland is an entertaining and informative video program tracing the origins of the construction of Wolf Creek Dam, near Jamestown, Ky. The dam backed up the Cumberland River for more than 100 miles to form the 50,000 acres of water that was renamed Lake Cumberland by an Act of Congress in 1952.

The 50-minute DVD features historic, color film of the building of the dam, the moving of the city of Old Burnside and the filling up of Lake Cumberland in early 1951.

Dam workers, residents who were forced to move and people who began Lake Cumberland's marinas are among more than 20 people featured in interviews recalling the emergence

of the area as a water paradise.

There is plenty of modern-day video, which shows the evolution of Lake Cumberland into the popular attraction it is today.

Through the interviews, pictures and film, the video shows how the lake virtually transformed the entire surrounding region in South Central Kentucky.


The DVD also features more than 20 minutes
of bonus footage, including the days when steamboats plied the Cumberland River, additional color film footage of the Wolf Creek Dam construction, the growth of the Lake Cumberland region and the evolution of houseboats on the lake.

 
 One Town Moved, Another Eliminated As Lake Cumberland Was Created
  The town of Burnside, Kentucky was literally moved to higher ground in anticipation of the creation of Lake Cumberland, formed with the construction of Wolf Creek Dam.

Before the dam was completed 1950, entire structures in Burnside were moved as part of the relocation.

A bridge span was submerged when the lake filled up faster than expected.

Rowena, Kentucky used to be located about 50 miles from Burnside, just south of present-day Jamestown.

But Rowena was completely eliminated after Wolf Creek Dam was built and the Cumberland River was backed up to form the lake. The old family farms and homesteads are now completely under water.




 
The Lumber store, top, was among the buildings moved at Burnside, Ky.  Before the lake, steamboats were common sights along the Cumberland River, including the steamer Rowena, shown above.